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The Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) is supported in part by the National Science Foundation (NSF) under Grant Number DBI RCN 0639229 and MSB 1137327, 1137353 and other generous donors. This blog receives technical support from the Center for Limnology (CFL) at University of Wisconsin-Madison and Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies. Any information, opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this blog are those of the individual author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of NSF, CFL, Cary Institute, GLEON or GLEON Student Association (GSA).
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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s 2012 National Lakes Assessment: data now available online

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released the 2012 National Lakes Assessment (NLA) data in December, which are now publicly available online.

Every five years, the EPA launches a comprehensive sampling campaign, where together with state and local governments, tribes, and many other agencies, they sample over 1000 lakes and reservoirs (hereafter, together referred to as waterbodies) across the United States. The final set of waterbodies that are sampled are selected randomly using a statistical survey design to appropriately sample waterbodies that are representative of the U.S. waterbody population across multiple size classes. The first comprehensive survey conducted by the EPA was in 2007, and so this represents the second survey. Approximately 400 waterbodies were resampled in 2012, and approximately 600 were newly sampled waterbodies.

Lakes and reservoirs sampled in the 2012 EPA National Lakes Assessment.

Lakes and reservoirs sampled in the 2012 EPA National Lakes Assessment.

For each sampled waterbody, there are a diverse suite of variables collected and analyzed such as: waterbody morphometric characteristics, lakeshore land use, profiles of e.g. temperature and dissolved oxygen, many water chemistry variables, and phytoplankton and zooplankton metrics such as density and biomass at the genus resolution. Field crews follow standardized protocols at each waterbody, and water samples for water chemistry and plankton counts are analyzed at central laboratories, subjected to multiple phases of quality control. (more…)

GLEON Embraces Citizen Science

Photo: Divers participate in citizen science on lake in Belgium. Credit: Laurent Miroult.

Divers from Project Baseline Muisbroek, Ben van Asselt and Koenraad van Schuylenbergh, retrieving tea bags in Lake Put van Ekeren, Belgium. (Photo by Laurent Miroult courtesy of NETLAKE.)

A new citizen science working group formed in July at the most recent all-hands meeting of the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) in Gaming and Lunz, Austria. With the official end of the Networking Lake Observatories in Europe (NETLAKE) EU COST Action this year, the working group activities under GLEON’s sister network in Europe found a new home by merging with ongoing initiatives in GLEON. What had been an adhoc group on citizen science in GLEON became a full-fledged working group this summer with several joint projects already underway.

“Experience from GLEON demonstrates how citizens contribute to the formulation of new research questions about their lakes as well as how research scientists are embracing citizen science in the network,” said Kathleen C. Weathers, co-chair of GLEON, and G. Evelyn Hutchinson Chair in Ecology at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, NY. “With the establishment of a new working group, GLEON members are not only embracing citizen science but actively designing and implementing
projects.”
(more…)

Revisiting GLEON’s 18th All-Hands Meeting in Gaming, Austria

By Jonathan Doubek

GLEON 18 was hosted at Kartause, a historic monastery in Gaming, Austria.

GLEON 18 was hosted at Kartause, a historic monastery in Gaming, Austria.

GLEON’s 18th All-Hands Meeting and joint meeting with NETLAKE was held from 4-8 July, 2016 in Lunz & Gaming, Austria. There were approximately 140 individuals who attended the meeting; about 60 percent of the participants were faculty, scientists, and/or staff and 40 percent were students and postdoctoral researchers. 33 countries were represented, spanning 85 institutions. The meeting consisted of a diversity of GLEONites and NETLAKE’ers, and for 40 percent of the participants, this was their first All-Hands meeting. (more…)

Undergraduate Research Focus at NE GLEON Regional Conference

By Blaize Denfeld

The 2nd Annual NE GLEON conference held at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, NY, from April 15-17, gave students and professors representing 11 universities and colleges in northeastern North America the opportunity to experience a “mini” version of a GLEON all-hands meeting. Although undergraduates were the focus of the weekend meeting, comprising nearly half of the 32 participants, graduate students and faculty members also gathered to share data and plan regional research activities for the coming year.

Photo: NE GLEON Participants. Credit: L. Borre.

NE GLEON participants included 15 undergraduates, eight graduate students or early career scientists, and nine faculty advisors or research scientists. A full list of participants’ names and affiliations can be found at the end of the post. (Photo credit: L. Borre)

“I had the amazing opportunity to attend the regional NE GLEON conference. There were several students from various institutions with a wide array of majors, backgrounds, and interests. Although this was my second time attending a NE GLEON meeting, I was still greeted with enthusiasm, almost like being reunited with old friends,” said Brian Kim, an undergraduate student from Colby College in Maine. (more…)

Welcomed, Valued, Engaged, & Inspired: Thoughts from a 1st-time GLEONite

Photo: GLEON network partners. Credit: Lisa Borre.By Kait Farrell

Going in to the GLEON17 meeting, I had no idea what to expect. Prior to my arrival in Korea, my only involvement with Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) had been through the fellowship program, and I wasn’t sure whether my experience led by Paul Hanson, Kathie Weathers, Hilary Dugan, and Grace Hong would be representative of the whole GLEON group. I needn’t have worried. Looking back on my first GLEON meeting, four words come to mind: welcomed, valued, engaged, and inspired.  (more…)

Reflections on GLEON’s 10th Birthday

Photo: GLEON founders Hamilton, Kratz, Arzberger and Lin. Credit: L.Borre

Left to right: Founding members of the GLEON Steering Committee: David Hamilton (New Zealand), Tim Kratz (USA), Peter Arzberger (USA), and Fang-Pang Lin (Taiwan) at the GLEON17 meeting (October 2015) in Chuncheon, South Korea. Photo by Lisa Borre

By Tim Kratz, Peter Arzberger, David Hamilton, and Fang-Pang Lin

Ten years ago, a relatively small group of lake scientists, information managers and information technology experts met in San Diego alongside experts on coral reefs in what we now consider to be the first GLEON meeting. G1, though of course none of us called it that – in fact the name GLEON didn’t yet exist – started an adventure in doing network science.

The goal of the first meeting was to explore whether developing an international network that deployed and made use of high-frequency measurements on lakes and coral reefs made sense scientifically, socially, and practically. It resulted in what we now know as the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network, or GLEON, a thriving, energetic, and creative network that has brought an international community of scientists together. But back then, we had only a dim inkling of what GLEON would become a decade later. (more…)

Carbon Cycling on Lakes (COCLAKE) Project: the Story of Brazil-Denmark Collaboration via GLEON

by Ludmila Brighenti

A lake is like a gigantic living creature that inhales and exhales carbon and exchanges energy with its surrounding environment. I became interested in this process and wanted to understand and predict whole-lake carbon exchange systems in Brazilian lakes. I worked on this topic for my Ph.D. (which I completed recently!), and deployed a high-frequency monitoring buoy to obtain data. This led to a new collaboration between researchers in Brazil and Denmark: Carbon Cycling on Lakes (COCLAKE), looking at the similarities and differences of temporal and tropical lake carbon cycling systems. All of this started from a simple conversation at a GLEON meeting. With the GLEON 16 meeting fast approaching, I wanted to share my story for those who are attending.

Location of Lakes Carioca and Dom Helvécio, State Park of Rio Doce, Minas Gerais state, Brazil.

Location of Lakes Carioca and Dom Helvécio, State Park of Rio Doce, Minas Gerais state, Brazil.

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NETLAKE Summer Training School: A Workshop for Both Early Stage Researchers and Lifelong Learners

By Liz Ryder and Eleanor Jennings

The first NETLAKE (Networking Lake Observatories in Europe, EU COST Action ES1201) training school took place from 12th to 17th June 2014 at the Erken Laboratory, Uppsala University, in Sweden. A multi-disciplinary group of 23 trainees from 19 countries took part. The training focused on automated monitoring and high-frequency data analysis, and included techniques for building simple temperature sensors, deployment, data analysis and processing, data visualization and practical data management.

Photo: NETLAKE training school, Erken Laboratory.

NETLAKE training school participants and trainers, Erken Laboratory, June 2014. (Photo credit: Liz Ryder)

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