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The Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) is supported in part by the National Science Foundation (NSF) under Grant Number DBI RCN 0639229 and MSB 1137327, 1137353 and other generous donors. This blog receives technical support from the Center for Limnology (CFL) at University of Wisconsin-Madison and Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies. Any information, opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this blog are those of the individual author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of NSF, CFL, Cary Institute, GLEON or GLEON Student Association (GSA).
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Welcomed, Valued, Engaged, & Inspired: Thoughts from a 1st-time GLEONite

Photo: GLEON network partners. Credit: Lisa Borre.By Kait Farrell

Going in to the GLEON17 meeting, I had no idea what to expect. Prior to my arrival in Korea, my only involvement with Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) had been through the fellowship program, and I wasn’t sure whether my experience led by Paul Hanson, Kathie Weathers, Hilary Dugan, and Grace Hong would be representative of the whole GLEON group. I needn’t have worried. Looking back on my first GLEON meeting, four words come to mind: welcomed, valued, engaged, and inspired.  (more…)

Reflections on GLEON’s 10th Birthday

Photo: GLEON founders Hamilton, Kratz, Arzberger and Lin. Credit: L.Borre

Left to right: Founding members of the GLEON Steering Committee: David Hamilton (New Zealand), Tim Kratz (USA), Peter Arzberger (USA), and Fang-Pang Lin (Taiwan) at the GLEON17 meeting (October 2015) in Chuncheon, South Korea. Photo by Lisa Borre

By Tim Kratz, Peter Arzberger, David Hamilton, and Fang-Pang Lin

Ten years ago, a relatively small group of lake scientists, information managers and information technology experts met in San Diego alongside experts on coral reefs in what we now consider to be the first GLEON meeting. G1, though of course none of us called it that – in fact the name GLEON didn’t yet exist – started an adventure in doing network science.

The goal of the first meeting was to explore whether developing an international network that deployed and made use of high-frequency measurements on lakes and coral reefs made sense scientifically, socially, and practically. It resulted in what we now know as the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network, or GLEON, a thriving, energetic, and creative network that has brought an international community of scientists together. But back then, we had only a dim inkling of what GLEON would become a decade later. (more…)