BLOG.GLEON

Home » Articles posted by Jonathan Doubek

Author Archives: Jonathan Doubek

GLEON Logo
donate now

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 11 other subscribers

NSF logo
The Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) is supported in part by the National Science Foundation (NSF) under Grant Number DBI RCN 0639229 and MSB 1137327, 1137353 and other generous donors. This blog receives technical support from the Center for Limnology (CFL) at University of Wisconsin-Madison and Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies. Any information, opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this blog are those of the individual author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of NSF, CFL, Cary Institute, GLEON or GLEON Student Association (GSA).
UW CFL Logo
Cary Logo

Postcards from the Field

GLEONite students and postdocs have been working on some exciting research projects this past year, so we invited them to send us “Postcards from the Field.” Below, we share with the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) community insights into some of these projects with a rapid tour around the globe (starting on the left and moving right by longitude in the map below) to get ready for the GLEON 19 All Hands’ Meeting. We’re looking forward to seeing you at Mohonk Lake soon! -GLEON Student Association

Sampling locations of the research ventures. We start at the left location and move right sequentially by longitude.

(more…)

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s 2012 National Lakes Assessment: data now available online

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released the 2012 National Lakes Assessment (NLA) data in December, which are now publicly available online.

Every five years, the EPA launches a comprehensive sampling campaign, where together with state and local governments, tribes, and many other agencies, they sample over 1000 lakes and reservoirs (hereafter, together referred to as waterbodies) across the United States. The final set of waterbodies that are sampled are selected randomly using a statistical survey design to appropriately sample waterbodies that are representative of the U.S. waterbody population across multiple size classes. The first comprehensive survey conducted by the EPA was in 2007, and so this represents the second survey. Approximately 400 waterbodies were resampled in 2012, and approximately 600 were newly sampled waterbodies.

Lakes and reservoirs sampled in the 2012 EPA National Lakes Assessment.

Lakes and reservoirs sampled in the 2012 EPA National Lakes Assessment.

For each sampled waterbody, there are a diverse suite of variables collected and analyzed such as: waterbody morphometric characteristics, lakeshore land use, profiles of e.g. temperature and dissolved oxygen, many water chemistry variables, and phytoplankton and zooplankton metrics such as density and biomass at the genus resolution. Field crews follow standardized protocols at each waterbody, and water samples for water chemistry and plankton counts are analyzed at central laboratories, subjected to multiple phases of quality control. (more…)

Samiullah Khan, New Co-Chair Elect for the GLEON Student Association

Photo: Sami Khan at Lake Quramber Bathy, Ghizer, GB. Credit: courtesy of Sami Khan.

Samiullah Khan during the first ever bathymetric survey of Lake Quramber (a.k.a Karumber), District Ghizer, GB, Pakistan. (One of the world’s high altitude biologically active lakes; elevation: 14301 feet).

By Samiullah Khan

I was recently offered and readily accepted the co-chair elect position of the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) Graduate Student Association (GSA), joining chair, Blaize Denfeld (Umeå University, Sweden) and co-chair Jonathan Doubek (Virginia Tech, USA). As a new member of the team, I would like to introduce myself and mention in brief my past and present professional and academic involvements. (more…)

Revisiting GLEON’s 18th All-Hands Meeting in Gaming, Austria

By Jonathan Doubek

GLEON 18 was hosted at Kartause, a historic monastery in Gaming, Austria.

GLEON 18 was hosted at Kartause, a historic monastery in Gaming, Austria.

GLEON’s 18th All-Hands Meeting and joint meeting with NETLAKE was held from 4-8 July, 2016 in Lunz & Gaming, Austria. There were approximately 140 individuals who attended the meeting; about 60 percent of the participants were faculty, scientists, and/or staff and 40 percent were students and postdoctoral researchers. 33 countries were represented, spanning 85 institutions. The meeting consisted of a diversity of GLEONites and NETLAKE’ers, and for 40 percent of the participants, this was their first All-Hands meeting. (more…)

A Preview of the GLEON 18 Meeting in Austria

By Samiullah Khan and Jonathan Doubek

The Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) all-hands meeting in Lunz & Gaming, Austria is fast approaching! The host team has been busy preparing the conference site, as well as organizing the daytime and evening activities. This blog post is to give you a historical and research perspective of the conference site and let you know what to expect at GLEON 18.

Lake Lunz Background

Lake Lunz is oligotrophic lake of a glacial origin located in the small town of Lunz am See, 120 km southwest of Vienna in the foothills of Austrian limestone. Lunz am See is part of the Eisenwurzen region, which is historically famous for iron ore mining since the time of Celtic and Roman, and later Habsburg Empires. The area is also known as the coldest place in Central Europe. The lowest temperature recorded was -56.2 oC in 1932. History reveals that Lunz am See has been part of Austria since the country was founded in 976, which was later purchased and bestowed to the monastery of Gaming by Duke Albercht XI.

Photo: Lake Lunz buoy.

Lake Lunz buoy (in-situ lake monitoring platform).

Lake Lunz is vernacularly called Lunzer Untersee (Lower Lake), which is due to its altitudinal relation to two small neighboring lakes, Mittelsee (Middle Lake) and Obersee (Upper Lake). Lake Lunz’s surface area is about 1 km2 with max and mean depths of 33.7 m and 20 m, respectively. The lake has approximately 27 km2 of uninhabited catchment area that consists of karstic plateau and is densely forested by Norway spruce and European beech. The area is very famous for tourism, and the main tourist attractions during summers are sport fishing, swimming, walking around the lake, hiking to the upper lakes and the famous summit peak of Dürrnstein, and skiing during winters. (more…)